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In S2 episode 20, we connect with Matt Belachew – Founder & CEO at Wearme to explore the wonderful world of wearables, find out about the upcoming wearable devices this year and the essentials in developing wearables ⌚️ 🕶️ 🎧

Sit back, relax, tune in and be the first to discover…

  • Matt’s background in wearables and what Wearme does 🕶️
  • What are the key trends in wearables seen over the past few years? 🎧
  • What opportunities and challenges come with the rapid growth of the wearable market? ⌚️
  • In a congested market, how can a wearable stand out from another one? 🕶️
  • What is the coolest wearable use case? 🎧
  • What advice would you give to those wanting to develop their own wearable?⌚️

ABOUT THE GUESTS

Matt Belachew is the Founder and CEO at Wearme, a platform for smart wearable developers to build and sell their products.

Follow Matt on LinkedIn

Find out more about Wearme

Episode Transcript

Tom White
Welcome back to The IoT Podcast show. I’m your host, Tom White. Today we’re joined by Matt Bennett, Chu. Matt is the CEO and Founder of Wearme. Wearme is a smart platform that enables wearable developers to build and sell their devices. Before we get into it. Guys, could you do me a favour? Could you like, comment and subscribe to the show? You’ll get notified when there’s a new episode. And as always, I don’t care how you’re connected, just as long as you’re connected. Matt, welcome to The IoT Podcast Show.

Matt Belachew
Thank you, Tom. Really happy to be here.

Tom White
Well, you’re very, you’re very welcome to be here. And it’s, it’s great to see you. I’m really interested, personally on this. I know a lot of the listeners and viewers know that I’m a big fan of wearables, and have countless wearables adorning my body. So I’m, I’m interested to know more about yourself. So as usual, love to kick off. Can you explain a little bit about your background? And also your company Wearme?

Matt Belachew
Sure, sure. Alright, so basically, it’s funny, you know, how actually things turned out? Because I think it was in the year 2005? For no apparent reason, I basically packed up and, you know, came to China, currently, actually, you know, I think I told you this, I am tuning in from Shanghai and China. And so what happened was, I landed in Guangdong Province, which is actually right next to Hong Kong, which is actually, you know, a couple of hours, you know, by train, and Guangzhou is the electronics capital of the world, like any PCBs, any, you know, smart wearables that you have, I am 100% Sure, at least they have, you know, a few components that were made in a snap, you know, entirely made in Guangzhou, even, you know, Apple actually get their way say, phones, actually, you know, they used to get them done there.

Matt Belachew
So, basically, so, that was when, you know, I, you know, when I came to China, you know, that’s when I got exposed to, you know, the whole situation. So, I got into hardware, especially when I’m a computer programmer, by trade. And so, I kind of got into hardware in early 2011, I was working on a project called Project mirror, which was actually it was a smart mirror, something like, you know, peloton, and you know, the other guys are trying to do now, but we were using, actually computer vision, using MATLAB. And, you know, and we had actually about 400 data points. And a pedestal where you stand in actually has like, the $10,000, scanner scanners, these are like, you know, the ones that you see in airports now, that actually, you know, scan your body, like in under two seconds.

Matt Belachew
And so basically, this mirror had a wearable component. And so that’s when I got into wearables, which, you know, especially in those days, in 2011, definitely, at its infancy. I mean, if people were actually wearing, you know, a smartwatch people would, you know, basically be blowed off, like, I mean, people were talking about the latest, you know, pardon my French, but farting apps, and you know, all of you everybody was into apps, but that was when, you know, I got into wearables, which is actually, you know, very challenging that time because there weren’t many What do you say, sensors that are available as now and also things where it you know, very, very expensive like, according to the latest data that I have, actually since in since 2011, if you compare 2011 to 2020, the cost of what you say parts, and especially parts that go into wearables has declined by 70% this is seven zero.

Matt Belachew
So basically, right now is actually the time for wearables, you know, but back then in 2011, that was totally unheard of. So that’s how, you know, fast forward, that’s how I got started. And, you know, fast forward 2019, that’s when I founded Wearme. And, you know, gotten serious about it. So currently, we’re doing really awesome, you know, we brought a bunch of wearable products to market. And, you know, looking forward to, you know, the new products that we’re going to be turning out, you know, in the next, you know, few years.

Tom White
Okay, fantastic. So, come from a computing, programming background, obviously, you mentioned MATLAB there- various sort of hardware languages, etc. And then decided to found Wearme in 2019, obviously, the cost of components, obviously, come down to 2011 to 2020. That’s that you said 70%? One would imagine they’ve gone back up again, with the recent supply chain. So yeah, you can get hold of them. But so what does Wearme actually produce then? Can you talk a little bit about you’ve got products out there in the market was r&d at the moment?

Matt Belachew
Yes, yes. So basically, just to give you how, Wearme actually got started, it was actually born out of the frustrations that I actually went through while trying to consult few startups that were actually hardware startup. And as I said, you know, in 2011, you know, I kind of touched on it, but you know, it was too early. And, you know, you would imagine by 2018-2019, you would, you know, you’d imagine that, I mean, these problems have been solved. But, you know, I found out that, you know, they were stuck, it was so that difficult, like, I mean, you know, getting started, you know, a lot of a bunch of people that I was talking to these are actually, you know, small and medium sized, wearable designers have no idea where to start. They have no idea, you know, basically, how do you make a wearable, they have really, really awesome, like, I mean in the sense these are like wearables, that could really change the way we live, you know, some are like, you know, not to actually you know, name names, but some wearables are even, you know, way ahead of even you know, the large companies that are actually you know, currently you know, controlling almost 70% of the market. So, basically what it is, is that, so, Wearme was born out of that frustration. Where, you know, since I already went through this, I do not want, you know, other people to go through the same, you know, this sort of situation. So, what I did was, I kind of leveraged my connections that I have cultivated in the past almost 18 years, out here in China, then these are, you know, like factories, these are, you know, engineering companies out here, that can actually provide, you know, a real quality service, especially in manufacturing, and bringing, you know, the innovative products to market. So, basically that is, in a nutshell what we do at Wyoming, we help small and medium sized, smart, wearable designers to quickly prototype and go to market with their wearable.

Tom White
Okay, fantastic. And I think you’ve got a real added advantage of being 18 years now. You’ve been living in China?

Matt Belachew
Yes. Almost 18 years now, actually, you know, coming Valentine’s Day. Okay,

Tom White
You moved on Valentine’s Day?

Matt Belachew
Wow, that tells you something, right. I was lonely.

Tom White
Absolutely. Hopefully, you’re still not lonely. But, you know, if anything, you’ve got a wearable with you right. So you’re never alone with wearable. So getting into the thick of it a little bit more. So obviously, the wearable market is huge. It’s growing year by year. You mentioned the costs of components until recently. Yes, we’re coming down massively. In terms of devices, what types of devices and the key trends have you seen in particular, in the last few years and what has been most popular?

Matt Belachew
Okay, cool. So just to give you like, just to give you what you say, sort of like, for comparison, just a little bit of data here. So basically, currently, the wearable industry is now at a $30 billion business. So that was just only what do you say 21 billion a year ago. So just in the span of a year, especially you know, with COVID and you know, the current you know, situation and despite the fact that you know, there are like what you say supply chain punches, especially you know, and get If you still like, you know, it’s added almost 30%, you know, you’re on your growth, and they expect it to reach actually around 60 billion by 2025-26. So it’s really, really a tough rocket ship, you know what I mean? Like, I mean, it’s just going to explode exponentially.

Matt Belachew
And what I’ve seen so far, especially on wearables, so basically, you know, during the pandemic, there was, you know, like, you know, COVID, tech related products were pretty popular. This includes like, you know, dispensing alarm, these are actually wearables that you have, like, you know, whatever, people, if they’re worn, like, if you wear him, and I wear them, then you know, the moment we come into three feet, to six feet, you can actually set it as would actually alert, you know, for social distancing, which was, you know, a lot of people actually kind of cashed on that. And also, wearables with what do you say, thermistors? Embedded thermostats, like, in a sense, you know, one of the symptoms for COVID, were actually, you know, fever and, and everything. So, these thermistors, you know, enabled smartwatches, were also kind of hot. But these days, a lot of people actually, if I tell you are not going to believe this, a lot of people come to Wearme, and the most searched item right now, is actually a smart bikini..

Tom White
I didn’t think you were gonna say that.

Matt Belachew
No, I know, like, actually, you know, we can even back it up with data. And, you know, actually, there’s, there’s a reason behind that one of our advisors actually was working with, I think, with Colgate Palmolive. And he worked on, you know, previously, on a smart bikini concept, where, you know, it’s kind of it has an app, and you know, a UV sensor that kind of tells the person who’s actually to actually get inside or where when you say, suntan lotion on a timely manner. Based on, you know, the skin tone, and, you know, etcetera, and everything. And so he kind of mentioned Wearme, so I guess that’s why people come to Wearme on his, you know, website, so people come to Wearme and what they search is for that. Followed by smart sports bras the one that we’re actually currently working on. That’s also heavily searched a while back also, we had a smart shoes. So people are actually what do you say, getting into smart fashion, like, in a sense in fashion tech, but also, on the other side, you have like, actually, fleet tech, which has been especially, you know, towards, you know, like, last and if last year, and you know, early this year also people tend to actually, you know, search for, these are like, smart masks like sleeping masks. We also have these, when you say OXImeters, like, you know, for sleep deprivation, like health tech. So, these sleep Tech, I would, I would say sleep tech, and health related hardware errors have been, you know, actually, you know, get into a much higher attention.

Tom White
I agree and recognise certainly on the latter part of what you were saying. That’s something I’ve been aware of smart textiles in general, it’s quite growing. But the sleep and the health side is really, really important. From a personal point of view. I don’t sleep particularly well, and haven’t for a while. So I’ve invested in products like cocoon, and various other earbuds and weighs and hearables to improve that. And some are really quite good. Right. So I think from a health perspective, monitoring oxygen monitoring different levels to improve sleep architecture, I think is so so important. And, you know, we started off to saying this is quite quite jovial around the whole smart bikini concept. Right, but I think certainly, you know, some some of the things that we can do here are really fantastic from from from the sleeping aspect. I mean, it’s something that’s really interesting for me and I, when we were putting together the questions for the show, is really how does a company in your view stand apart in what is a congested market? And, and, you know, there’s a lot of different watches, right, for instance, there’s quite a few different wearables. And I don’t know if congested actually is the right word? Yeah, well, I guess it’s relative, isn’t it to the amount of requirements by, you know, supply and demand basically speaking, right, you know, is it congested? So, what’s your view on that Matt?

Matt Belachew
Yeah, well, that is actually really, really, really good question that you that you raised there. Especially, you know, like, everybody knows, you know, these really cheap wearables, you know, you can actually get now a smartwatch for like five bucks, but it only works like for a week or two, and, you know, it stops working. So, yeah, like, there’s, there’s a huge competition like, especially, as you said, like, you know, with the regular way, say wearables, like these are actually like smartwatches you know, activity trackers. And you know, to a certain point also, like, there are like, in like, headphone earbuds and so on and so forth. Like, basically, which are actually what we call it, like a first generation type of wearable. And, and these are the key even, you know, that for for Wearme to exist, like, what makes us even, you know, what do you say, like, we kind of, like, put it as our main dogma or our own, or say, main doctrine is that, the first thing is, we go after quality, quality is like, absolutely important. We did validation research, you know, when I was actually, you know, before building, founding, Wearme, I did a validation research among, you know, smart, wearable users. And what I found out is that, especially users in the US, they prefer a good quality, higher price. But you know, with a more durable, long lasting, smart, wearable app, compared to like, for example, here in China, which was actually, you know, a shorter lifespan, and, you know, they don’t really, they want quality, but you know, not to the US, you know, sort of, you know, standards.

Matt Belachew
So, I, you know, since we’re an American company, and you know, 95% of our market is actually out there in the US. So we actually, you know, quality for each one of our smart wearable designer status, first thing that we actually adhere to. And the second thing is, this is one of our motto, you build a wearable to address a problem not to impress, so we said bill to address not to impress. So it’s not just, you know, to show off, you know, a cool tech or, you know, just to say like, Hey, you know, we have this type of wearable, no, it’s not, we don’t build for that we build so that, you know, we can actually solve a real world problem that is out there, in a sense, that is impactful, that actually solves people’s real problems. So that is how you actually, you know, stand out. And also, one last thing is that, if you’re doing what everybody else is doing, it’s really hard to stand out. Like, in a sense, you know, another smartwatch is not going to cut it, that if you come up with let’s say, a smartwatch, that is specifically for diet for, you know, for, you know, let’s say specific type of working out, or, you know, for a specific type of what do you say, like, for example, a fashion statement, there was actually one, a new VR watch, I don’t know, if you’ve ever seen it, we were actually working with this company, you know, to help them develop it. The entire thing was an AMOLED screen. So this is like a touchscreen, that is, you know, everywhere and was it was one of our like, back in 2019. it was one of our, you know, best sellers. So, basically what it is, is that, you know, if you build to address a real problem, and you know, if it is a good quality product, then that’s not a problem, you will definitely be sending out but if you’re doing everything that everybody else is doing then it will be difficult to differentiate them stand out of the crowd.

Tom White
Yeah, I mean, thank you for that. I mean, you you’ve come in quite nicely actually to my next question. I want you to hone down on that a little bit more. So you said about building to address not to impress? I mean, that’s a great motto, right? Ultimately, if it has if as a utility, it’s useful, and someone’s going to use it, you know, in the same way people buy, you know, cryptocurrencies because it has a utility or an NFT. It has a utility utility in some form. And the same can be applied to wearables to go further. So, what more advice would you give someone wanting to develop their own wearable product? Beyond because it solves a problem – What else can they learn from?

Matt Belachew
That is that is also very insightful. So the first thing is, like, every time, you know, when people actually come and talk to me, you know, they come to where we are, they say, Hey, I have an idea. And I want to build this type of wearable. So we kinda like actually rate success. We kind of calculate like a success factor based on the first thing is like, how, like how relatable is the problem that this person is trying to solve. Like, I mean, you should not just build for the sake of building, you know what I mean? And then try to find a problem later. But rather, you know, you need to be able to solve a problem that you have personally experienced that, you know, you take it personal, that you have already experienced that problem. So that, if it’s such a problem, you know, what I mean, you would have that conviction that drive, as well as what do you see the commitment to actually make it happen. Because, honestly, speaking, you know, building a wearable is not like, you know, it’s not like making software or an app, you know, it’s a lot more complicated. Like, in a sense, it’s on the fringe of what do you say, between software data, and also hardware. So you need to have, what do you say, that type of drive to be able to actually that relate relationship, you know, with the problem, so that, you know, you go on, and, you know, actually, when you solve it you’ve got the reason to drive, and, you know, the motivation.

Matt Belachew
And the second thing that I would advise is to build incrementally, like not, you can’t have everything at once, because this is something that I usually have, like, you know, situation with, you know, fellow smart, wearable designers, like, they just say, Okay, I want this, I want that I want this feature, I want this, and I go like, Oh, wait a minute, we can’t just pack this up, you know, there’s such a thing called over packaging, don’t over package starts with, you know, some, like really important feature of your product, and then reiterate and build, you know, as you go along with having a clear product mix and also keeping up with your customer voice. A

Matt Belachew
nd, you know, last but not least, would be to pretotype before prototype. Prototyping is actually like, you know, the Mechanical turk, just, you know, come up with, you know, an innovative way to actually test your product, and validate your product before, you know, investing money and time to get your product, you know, for building yourself. Actually, there’s a really nice book, I don’t know, if you’ve, if you’ve heard of it, it’s called The Right Fit I can actually, you know, I can actually share the Amazon link to get it, it is one of the this is one of the books that I actually demand, each one of my colleagues, you know, at wearme to read, you know, when they join us, it talks like in detail about building a product that customers love that customers want, instead of, you know, just, you know, building for the sake of building and, you know, afterwards try to find a problem that actually builds the product that you actually built.

Tom White
Well, thank you for that. I mean, hopefully, our listeners and viewers by the time this goes out, there’ll be a link to the comment with that. But I think that’s a really that’s really good rules there. Right? I think, you know, have the drive and the passion to carry on with this idea because it relates to you, it’s a relatable thing and that’s what’s going to get it across the line. Have a clear roadmap, understand exactly where you’re going with this. Go to pretotype before you prototype to save yourself some money, frankly, speaking, and heartache time, and everything else that comes with you know, potential a failure in the product. And I think, yeah, really good advice there. And I think, you know, focus groups as well, right, you know, asking what will you know, what, what do you think about this? You know, is this going to work out? You know, what, what are your views? Because, again, one might be very passionate about one subject, but it probably isn’t relatable to lots of other people. So, you know, that’s, that’s a, it’s an interesting concept, right? I think that’s absolutely great advice in terms of that. So lots of people will be going on this journey, and lots of people will be coming to you, Matt, and you know, Wearme is doing some fantastic work? What can we expect? What can we expect to see over the next five years in terms of other types of developments? You know, there’s lots of talk, but what is what is definitely going to be happening?

Matt Belachew
Yeah, well, in the previous podcast we were actually talking about this, you know, lately, you know, the wearable, what do you say, industry kind of started to have like, the, what do you say sub areas, like, for example, there are like, ingestibles, I don’t know, if you ever heard of these. These are like, actually like pillbots, like, these are robots that actually you can swallow, you ingest them. And they have, like, you know, camera, and, you know, it’s like, you know, endoscopy, but you know, on a Bluetooth and actual things that actually could be ingested, you know, later. This is one very, you know, one area that that actually has formed. And also like, the Neurolink, which is actually one of the other companies that are run by, I think Elon Musk, they’re trying to actually, you know, put a chip in the human brain, and, you know, basically, that interacts, you know, and there are like these bionics, you know, that actually, exoskeleton and everything that, you know, are going to be, you know, developing, like, in a sense, you know, I expect to see a few more, you know, we say, developments in that area.

Matt Belachew
But if we’re talking about, you know, wearables proper, the first thing is that wearables are going to be everywhere and anywhere, and they’ll also be more sustainable. Less, battery powered, and also more invisible, just like, electricity. And, you know, computers are now, like, these days, like, you know, back in the days, you know, you know, back to the days, you know, electricity was an everywhere. But nowadays, when you go to a broom, you expect that there isn’t electricity in there, you know, what I mean? So, it’s kind of is, you know, more, what do you say, built into the infrastructure. So, I see that in the future, like, when you buy a shirt, you would expect it to have, you know, type of sensors that you would expect, like, heart rate sensor, or, you know, maybe would be powered by, you know, human sweat and, you know, hand movements, and so on and so forth. And another thing in the wearable proper market that I expect to see in the next five years would be a move towards a third generation smart wearable, because currently, the most popular wearables are first type, or first generation, which are just, you know, a Bluetooth connection, and like, you know, headphones, you know, just with Bluetooth, and so on, and so forth.

Matt Belachew
And I think there will be a transition to generation two, these are type of wearables with their own app, you know, accompany. And then the third generation is going to be, you know, wearables with some type of machine learning and AI that is actually, you know, built into them, which makes them truly, truly smart. And, finally, there will be an explosion of small and medium sized wearable designers. This is actually, you know, I don’t know if you’ve seen the stats on Kickstarter and Indiegogo, like right now, as we speak, there are about 1500, would you say wearable, and IoT, you know, related projects, you know, as we speak, that are, you know, waiting for someone, you know, to fund them. So, there’s going to be an explosion, and you know, wearables are going to be everywhere.

Tom White
Yeah, some fantastic advice. And I think, I think, I think what was really poignant for me was to talk about the second to third generation. So the fact that some of these wearables are going to have their own machine learning and AI built, built, built in to the tip by design, as opposed Yeah, and I think that’s really, really important. One of the things that interests me you know, you’re talking neuro link. You know, I remember five, six years ago when RFIDs was a real big thing. And everyone’s like, Oh RFID is gonna change the world. People work people were put, we’re talking about the fact that you’re going to have them under your skin and that you’ll be able to go through, you know, certain places in the workplace, etc. And, you know, that was the whole in in it, how did you get into just? Injectable? Yeah. Oh, ingestible ingestibles? You know, I think that’s really interesting, but also worrying at the same time, I would be worried. Yeah, you know, I think, you know, how do you how do you govern the security around that? You know, and that’s another really big topic to make sure that that’s done in the right way and a whole other conversation spot for a very, very, very long time. Interesting, you should say that, just in addition to it, obviously, Indiegogo, Kickstarter, all of these crowdfunding campaign, right, lots of wearables on there, lots of people looking to go for Ivor Angel seed, or some of them going up to series A depending on what they’ve had already. Yeah. Do you have any advice for these companies? I mean, what, you know, how, how do you get funding in a congested market level? You know, you’ve spoken about how you stand apart, but how about some of these people go and get funding if they’ve never done it before? Right. Yeah. They Pretotype something, what’s your advice to them?

Matt Belachew
That is such a really, really cool question. And we actually have a very detailed, what do you say, guide on our website, on Wearme.me. And basically, what it is, is that like, you know, when you build after, you know, after you validated your idea, then basically, you need to build a prototype. Because, you know, gone are the days that you just make, you know, a video and you know, a lot of people have been you know swindled up their money, you know, and so, a lot of people do not really trust the videos anymore. So you need to have, you know, something there that can actually is a proof of concept that shows that you’ve already thought about it, you have already ironed out the details. So once you have your prototype, you have two avenues.

Matt Belachew
So the first one is you can actually go for a product crowdfunding, so which is actually using Indiegogo, and Kickstarter. But in order to do that you need to have you need to partner with companies that actually can help you achieve that. Currently, we work with, you know, multiple milestones. Like, for example, I don’t know if you ever heard of them, gadget flow is one such company that we work with, there’s also another company called that crowd funding formula. And this, these are actually really refuge, reputed companies that actually help smart wearable designers to actually even you know, they would help them validate the idea for a very, you know, comparatively low amount of money, very low. And this is like, you know, you know, under 10k, you know, they basically would run a campaign, a validation campaign for them. And based on that validation campaign, even some of them, they actually connect them with funding opportunities, like these are actually lenders, you know, based on the success of this validation, they hook them up with lenders who would be able to cover, what do you say that marketing costs, and especially like that crowd funding formula, they’ve raised repeatedly, over 100k on each single project, they wouldn’t even you know, bother to work as it is, it is a type of product that within reach, you know, that amount of success.

Matt Belachew
So, what I would say is, that is one way, the other way would be to actually go to equity crowdfunding. So this is when you know, you form your company, and basically, you know, raise money from angels and micro VC, and also accelerators to some degree. That is, you know, where you can actually get the money, but also need to make sure though, you need to have a valid idea, like, in a sense, your idea needs to be really valid, that you have done your work like in a sense, you did your freedom typing, as well as also some type of prototyping because a lot of investors are scared of when you say hardware investments, and unfortunately, they, you know, a lot of them are not really, what do you say familiar with the wearable industry? So they kind of like the moment we say, we’re building a wearable. First thing that you see is like, oh, Sorry, we don’t do hardware. But the thing is wearables are on what do you say, as I said earlier on the fringe of hardware, software and data. So basically, they’re a much What do you say, easier bet than, you know, purely, you know, hardware, like, you know, building a rocket, or you know, other stuff like that. So, as long as you have a good clear idea, as long as you have some type of prototype, and as long as you have some type of validation, I think you could easily you know, raise the money that would be needed in order to bring your products into life.

Tom White
Matt, fantastic insights. Honestly, really, really, really fantastic. Thank you so much for sharing them. And I’ll be sure, I’ll be sure to check out the guide on your website myself, actually, just for my own personal interest. Matt, we’re nearing the end of the show. What I wanted to do is ask you a question actually, from Jonathan Seelig. So Jonathan Seelig is the co founder of rich, and he was on our former episodes on our last episode. Jonathan’s big fan of wearable was and basically spoke about his his passion for wearables. And as his interest in the market, one of the things he was wondering about that he wanted to ask you in particular was, what kind of infrastructure will be required to support the massive proliferation in IoT devices, because he’s assuming taking, for instance, if you’ve got a smart pair of running shoes in Stockholm, they’re not really going to be relaying that data back to a cloud facility and say, San Jose, so what what what does the cloud at the future look like to support the massive amount of wearables that are going to be flooded in the market?

Matt Belachew
Yeah, that is that is actually that is one of when you say, the most sensitive topics in the wearable, what do you say industry? Like, specifically, you know, with the current situation, you know, over there in Europe, with GDPR, as well as in California, we have CCPA. And there is that what do you say, their stop hardware, you know, data, like, especially in China, also, they have their own new rules, actually, that rolled out just earlier this year. And what everyone is saying is that, you know, that data needs to say, you know, within within the country, it needs to be anonymized enough. So that, you know, there’s no identifiable data that is actually stored in when you say, a public cloud.

Matt Belachew
So the simplest, and, you know, the, the more straightforward answer, that I, you know, that we were me, what we’re actually doing right now, is, we do not use any cloud at all, like, so the main reason it says, because when, when we kind of like, so what we do is, like, we stored the data on the phone itself, like, in a sense, you know, the many phones can, you know, have their own voice a built in storage, and after that we give, what do you say, in the coming few years, what we want to do is currently stored in the phone, and then after, after that, we give the option for that user to actually either upload it to, you know, some sort of centralised way, say, kind of what do you call it a distributed type of waste storage, or basically, you know, they can keep, like, you know, a backup, you know, or some sort of like that, you know, Personal Backup facility, like, you know, how they have on Apple’s got their when you say, the iTunes backup, right, where you pay, you know, a certain storage. So, that is the, you know, the angle that we’re actually taking bet with, you know, web 3.0, you know, currently, you know, it’s a, that’s, that’s where everybody is, so I see an opening for some type of distributed, and what is a blockchain? Like, that type of technology being employed, the main reason is, you know, like, the data will be private that stuff the person, and also the fact that, you know, the person would have the, we see the key to be able to actually provide that data, you know, for, you know, others to actually, you know, have access to it, or, you know, basically to block anyone, you know, from accessing that data. So, I can see that type of voice, a web three types of distributed, what do you say, cloud computing, that are not really international, but rather more local, you know, what did they call it, like, more fragmented, you know, type of clouds, would you say infrastructure?

Tom White
Yeah, yeah, sure. Sure. Yeah. Well, I’ve been fantastic answer and interesting that you shouldn’t be using cloud at the moment, but I understand it. You know, I think privacy laws and more heavily does sometimes make this prohibitive. But I’d be interested to see how we can get past this right. Yeah, Matt, thank you for joining us today. Yeah. So, honestly, I really enjoyed it. Can you just remind us where can people find out more about Wearme?

Matt Belachew
Wearme.me. And also actually, if you just go on Google and you search for smart, wearable, smart wearables were being or, you know, wear me watch or wear me, you know, any kind of wearable, we usually rank first so you can find us there as well.

Tom White
Yeah, you’re gonna have to give me your SEO consultants details. Yeah, we do we do that. Yeah. Absolutely. So thank you for joining us.

Matt Belachew
again. Yeah. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me. It was really, really awesome talking to you.

Tom White
Check out our website theiotpodcast.com where you can watch all of the previous episodes. It will be great to hear your thoughts on the wearables trend, how this is going to shape the future. And hopefully, I’ll see you on the next one.

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