IoT Podcast Logo

In S2 episode 15, we connect with Rob Hollands to learn about all things connected packaging🧃📲, how IoT is transforming the retail experience for brands & consumers and what this means for sustainability♻️👖.

Sit back, relax, tune in and be the first to discover…

  • Rob’s background 📦
  • What SharpEnd does within connected packaging 🧃
  • The technology being used for connected packaging 👖
  • How IoT is being used to bring brands closer to consumers What connected packaging means for sustainability 📦
  • What connected packaging means for sustainability 📲
  • How leading brands like Levi’s, MAC and Yeo Valley are utilising connected packaging?
  • And much more!

ABOUT THE GUESTS

Rob Hollands is the Managing Director at SharpEnd a full-service strategy, creative content and analytics company moving brands closer than ever to consumers by connecting the real world via IoT.

Follow Rob on LinkedIn

Find out more about SharpEnd

Episode Transcript

Tom White
Welcome back to The IoT Podcast shows as always, I’m your host, Tom White. Today I’m joined by Rob Hollands. Rob is the Managing Director- Sharpend. Sharpend is a full service strategy, creative content and analytics company moving brands closer than ever to consumers connect in the real world via IoT. Before we get into it, guys, can you do me a favour? Can you like, comment and subscribe to the show? It means you’ll get notified when there’s a new episode. Rob, welcome to the IoT podcast show.

Rob Hollands
Hey, Tom, thank you very much for having me. Looking forward to it.

Tom White
Likewise. Rob, fantastic to have you here. For our viewers, then, so this is Rob Hollands from Sharpend. Could you explain a little bit about your business? How you got into IoT and what it is you do?

Rob Hollands
For sure. Yeah, so kicking off with Sharpend. Sharpend et up back in 2015. And you’ll probably remember, and I’m sure some of your listeners and viewers will IoT was a real buzzword at the time and particularly amongst brands and marketers who we look to support. And we really set about to try and demystify this IoT space and translate it really for brands and tell them how they might be able to use it to connect with their consumers.

Tom White
They set up in 2015. Absolutely, yeah. So big buzzword back then lots of people talking about, you know, around this time, half a trillion devices or whatever magical massive number. Remember? Yeah, yeah, yeah. So interesting, actually to talk about that. So the the IoT podcast, one of its main missions, and part of its mission statement, really is to demystify what IoT is to the man on the street, right? So love the fact that Sharpend was was conceived to do that. And so, so you, you set up a business MD. And tell me a bit about your journey from from here on in?

Rob Hollands
Yeah, definitely. Yeah. And exactly as you say, whereas, you know, demystifying for the man on the street, we set about to do that same thing for brands, and then consumers via those brands. And so exactly, I had an interesting background, I started off in slightly more traditional marketing, and then very quickly moved capitalised on the digital space during the.com, boom, and got into what was really at the time, a group of the first digital agencies back in 2002, to 2006.

Rob Hollands
Co-founded an agency there with a friend, which we set up ran for a number of years called Untitled digital agency, and then sold it to a US group. And I guess that’s where this journey started is that the US group that we sold it to was very much focused on brand design and packaging, and, you know, different business, but they were looking to digitalise their business at the time. And I was absolutely blown away about this about the scale of packaging and the opportunity there. And we spent a number of years trying to look at how we could, you know, modernise, digitalized was a very traditional medium. And then in about 2017 18, I started seeing another guy out there that was talking about kind of similar things in the IoT space. And that was a guy called Tamworth who had set up Sharpend and we very quickly realised, you know, we were on a similar mission. Him with a startup meaner in a much bigger corporate, and we realised we’d be stronger and better together. And we, you know, that’s been the last few years, the business has gone from strength to strength, and we’re doing some fantastic things.

Tom White
Oh, amazing. Yeah. It’s great to hear that and interesting background. I mean, a lot of the people that we have on the show come from either a technical engineering background move up into tech positions or sales as such, but nice, it’s nice to see you coming from a slightly different angle with the marketing and perhaps that’s why Sharpend’s visuals are so one point and the brand story and what that is, and for anyone that hasn’t seen it, you know, check out the website. It’s a really, really good bit of a showcase for what good websites look like. And you’ve touched on there, Rob in regards to connected packaging. So this is probably the first time that we’ve had someone on the show talking about connected packaging. Just to delve into that a bit more deeper, can you explain why connected packaging is important? And the capabilities and technologies used within it?

Rob Hollands
Yeah, I would love to. And I often when I’m talking about these things, and this, I mentioned that they kind of just been blown away by the scale of packaging. When you think about the Internet of Things space, and you look at, you know, look at the number of human beings on the planet, look at the number of households look at the number of cars, you’re all in the billions, which is absolutely incredible, you start to see that number ramp up when you look at apparel, and clothing, you know, 80 billion items of clothing in our lives at any one time. The thing that massively excited me about packaging is it’s not the billions or millions, it’s trillions, now that they reckon there is five to 10 trillion pieces of packaging in our lives at any one time. And I’ve always been blown away by that as an opportunity if we could connect, you know, even a small percentage of that trillions and trillions of pieces of packaging, by lots of different technologies.

Rob Hollands
But if we could connect just a small percent, what a huge opportunity to reach consumers to add value into people live to build the IoT, across across trillions of things. That’s been that’s been one of the things that’s really excited me about packaging. When we talk about the technologies, we’re really agnostic in this kind of space as to what we what we would tell a client, you know, it’s based on what what problem are we trying to solve? What’s the creative opportunity, and then we reach the technology solution, but there’s some common ones, you know, QR codes on pack is a really great way to connect with consumers pretty low tech, we’ve really pioneered the connected packaging space with NFC, Near Field Communications, the ability to tap rather than scan. And increasingly, as the technology gets better, we’re doing a lot more in the, in the kind of computer vision or image recognition or product recognition space. And then you see that leading on to things like augmented reality, or kind of more VR based experiences. They’re probably the key pieces of tech. But you know, other things like Bluetooth, this, there’s lots of ways that you can engage consumers via private packaging.

Tom White
Yeah, I mean, it’s really interesting how so much technology can be built into packaging. In fact, I’m telling a lie, I said at the start of that we haven’t had anyone on about connected packaging, but we did have Hima Mukkamala from Pelion, who mentioned briefly, and I vividly remember it because I was blown away at the time about the adhesive tape right to secure boxes, actually having microchips and a circuit board embedded within that tape is something that they’re looking at and working on, which is, which is crazy, right, you know. But fantastic. In terms of its advantages, obvious benefits I can think about here is tracking, asset monitoring, etc. Can you talk about some of the benefits that brands can can have when it comes to collect the packaging wrong?

Rob Hollands
Definitely. Yeah, you touched on one of them actually, probably the one that we hear a lot initially, around kind of authentication or knowing whether someone’s done something or interacted with a product, whether that’s through, you know, a smart closure on our wines and spirits bottle, or the tape that you were talking about there. And the truth is, a lot of the areas we’re exploring were around consumer experiences, and brands seeing this as a way to deliver stuff they might be delivering somewhere else directly with the consumer. So I tap or scan or interact with a product for a brilliant brand experience, and storytelling, or to unlock loyalty or rewards, or potentially to see things like that products journey through the supply chain, or things like authentication. To brand experience is definitely a big area for us. We’re seeing some kind of interesting growth areas. Packaging as a medium has traditionally been pretty inaccessible. You know, if you’re visually impaired or suffer from other some other disability packaging is not particularly accessible.

Rob Hollands
And we’ve seen quite a lot of tech innovation in the space to look at how can I interact with that pack, to have a more accessible experience was to actually be able to have an experience that I wouldn’t have been able to have before. There is a massive we talk about it a lot. There is a massive data opportunity for brands and you know this this is across the IoT space, knowing who’s buying and using your product, knowing where and when they’re interacting with it is really valuable, valuable data and Sharpend kind of should have said it start really but sharp and kind of splits into two businesses. One very kind have agency orientated, consultative, you know, what would compel someone to interact with something? And then what’s the brilliant experience when they do. And then the other part of the business, which we call is a platform called the IO.TT, and that’s all about issuing identities and managing what happens when someone does interact. And then reason I touched on it is they’re managing all of that great data that you can unlock if you can connect your products.

Tom White
Yeah, I mean, it’s truly fascinating and almost bewildering the amount of data that can be harnessed through IoT devices in general, let alone trillions of packages. Just to go back one step you mentioned about computer vision. And augmented reality, I’d be curious to know, what advancements are being made in the connected packaging industry around that, because obviously, at the moment, we have the QR codes, we have some of this technology readily accessible. Where do you see it going with computer vision and AR Rob?

Rob Hollands
It’s a really good question there when you’re talking to brands or consumers. In fact, you’ll know yourself AR- Augmented Reality is tended to be somewhat kind of a novelty based experience today, and I think one of the places AR is starting to move is actually into valuable experiences and kind of genuine value exchange, rather than just a small disposable piece of fun. That piece of fun can be great, you know, cost a lot of money, it takes a lot of time for something that’s, you know, downloaded or experienced once, where AR has helped massively, you know, the fact that this is now wrapless, and we’re constantly trying to push wrapless experiences. I think the experiences will get better, there’ll be deeper, there’ll be more meaningful for augmented reality, we still have the real challenge that a lot of what we try and do is, is understand that exact product that you’re you’re interacting with, you know, ideally, the individual product itself, but at least a kind of size or SKU or something like that, the challenge we do have, and I think this will improve massively with something like computer vision or image recognition is I can tell you, it’s a pair of Levi’s or a Yo Valley yogurt, I might not be able to tell you which exact product it is, or the exact size or something like that. And I think that technology will get better. And still, a lot of what we want to know is to we want to be knowing that consumers interacting with that exact product. And that’s probably one of the limitations of minute of AR, or computer vision.

Tom White
Yeah. I mean, the advantages of knowing you know, what people are buying, as opposed to something else down to the actual individual product, inherently, it’s going to have lots of advantages. But you know, work in progress, right? You mentioned a couple of brands there, keen to touch on that a little bit more so likes of Levi, MAC Cosmetics are here as well. And and obviously closer to home Yo Valley companies that you’re working with at the moment. And can you talk a little bit more about those projects and how Sharpend’s working with them?

Rob Hollands
A decade? Yeah, definitely. Yo Valley, obviously, great kind of British institution. In some other markets, be aware of it, but big dairy company, and we’ve worked with them that the reason they’re really interesting is again, back to that scale of packaged products, they ship millions and millions of yoghurt products into the market each year, we’ve used very simple technology and QR. Obviously, QR is one of those things that has come to market. You know, in the Western world, he has been less popular up until a couple of years ago. And then we’ve seen you know, Apple devices natively scanning via the camera view. And obviously QR around the pandemic has certainly become becomes a technology that we’re much more aware of. But in terms of Yo Valley, we’ve connected all of their products with QR down to individual SKU level. And we’re delivering their native first platform, which is a really nice kind of sustainability initiatives to the consumer can take all of that experience content will deliver you time recipes, based on your location based on the time of day of interaction, and some lovely grand storytelling, brand building consumer engagement work.

Rob Hollands
But we’ve also removed which I quite like is we’ve moved a big friction point. Slightly dull use case but it’s a good one nonetheless, that it was 54 taps on your mobile device to enter their loyalty code. And this is under under the lid alphanumeric code underneath there and it took you 54 taps on the phone to enter that code in uppercase, lowercase special characters, all of that good stuff. We’ve been able to remove that with a single scan of a QR code and instantly load what is called yo tokens into your yo comes wallet. And I love things like that looking at how this connected technology can now make consumers lives easier. Yeah, make it more meaningful make it more enjoyable in terms of experience. That’s a that’s a great example of doing that.

Tom White
Yeah. I mean, that’s a massive shift, isn’t it? I mean, I wouldn’t bother. I would imagine a lot of other people typing in a code like that. He just wouldn’t have time, right? Especially on a on a throwaway item, like a yoghurt pot, you know, the list of reactions to throw in the big, you’ve got three seconds to take a picture of a QR code, haven’t you? Let alone? Yeah, wash it, you know.

Rob Hollands
Yeah. So let’s at least make it easy for people to engage. And then of course, we’ve seen a big increase in the number of engagements, that’s a huge data opportunity for the brand. And all of the great stuff that then comes with that.

Tom White
I’m curious as to why you think QR codes were less picked up in Western society than they were perhaps, elsewhere in the world. Any reasons for that any research or any? You know, why were we slightly slower to adoption on that?

Rob Hollands
Well, do you know, this relates to QR codes, and actually, any of the tech solutions that we could talk about this IoT space? And what might one of my instincts have been in the industry long enough to kind of see it happen was we brands in particular, were guilty of seeing a technology pretty low cost and simple to implement, and delivering some pretty awful use cases. And you know, there’s great examples back in 2010, time, I guess, of QR codes out there on billboards that were impossible to scan or, you know, on a Marmite pack that then took you through to a unilever.com website and delivered a horrific experience, wasn’t mobile optimised, totally irrelevant to the consumer. And so I think in these markets, we damaged ourselves a bit by racing at the technology without really thinking about the reason and the creative experience and what solution we’re solving. And you can apply that to lots of things. I think that was one of the challenges. Device adoption is a huge one, you know, Apple, really dominant device in these markets didn’t really have any kind of favourable lens on QR codes. The moment I think it’s 2018, Apple bought them natively into the swipe on the camera.

Tom White
I remember that. Yeah, I remember you had to download an app. And it was just inconvenient, wasn’t it?

Rob Hollands
Inconvenient. And you remember those apps when they were free, but they had awful advertising, and they’re probably linked to some dodgy site, it was all a horrible user experience. And yeah, so I think that was one of the big challenges as it is, we’ve always had these technology things. We’ve seen it with NFC, as well as the device manufacturers continuously start to unlock the tech, you know, first off, they make it so it’s in the device, then they start to unlock it. So you can use it natively, then it ships with it activated. All of a sudden, we’ve got a much more captive audience, and we’ve got less friction points and drop off points. So we see adoption a lot faster, and the brands are behaving better. Now if you scan a QR code on a pack of Marmite now, it will deliver you an experience that’s worth scanning for.

Tom White
Yeah, and what a phrase that is an experience worth scanning for. Right? And I think yeah, well, that’s the whole point, isn’t it? Otherwise, you’re not going to do it? Or if you don’t want to, you’re certainly not going to do it again. You kind of one would imagine you want people to keep scanning, right? They keep doing this, they go back and forth. Not to be a one hit wonder.

Rob Hollands
Definitely we talk really early on is that why would anyone scan, tap interact holding in front of a camera or screen? Why would anyone do that? What’s the what’s the thing that’s going to compel them to do it? And then you’re exactly right, what what makes them go back to it and do it again? And again?

Tom White
Where are we going with connected packaging? So in terms of trends, what are these? What are these seen? Recently? We touched on it earlier with Bluetooth NFC, perhaps RFID. Other forms of connectivity? Where do you see the market shifting outside of QR codes, perhaps Rob?

Rob Hollands
Well, I think to 2021, we’ve gone out of it as a real arrival year for this technology. You won’t see all of that in market, but I can tell you these big the Unilever’s of the world, the PNG, the General Mills, these big holding companies with lots of brands below them have all made big, almost big moves into this space. And we’ll see that continuously hit the market this year. So it’s out there. We’re going to set a consumer expectation now that your product, whatever it is, whatever technology there’s going to be an expectation that it starts to become connected with a meaningful reason to connect. So I think that’s fantastic. We’ve set the baseline now the technology is there. The devices are ready to interact. consumer awareness of the technology has reached there and brands are doing good stuff with it. That’s fantastic.

Rob Hollands
For me, 2022 is all the buzzwords that we’ve heard in the last three weeks. There’s a event today around the kind of Metaverse, NF T’s web three, I think looking we’re going to see this year, some really great stuff around how connected packaging can play a role in that world. And it’s perfect for you think it’s such a physical thing, the CAC or the product itself. And increasingly, we’re looking at ways we can deliver digital things, you know, that garment in Roblox or in that Metaverse space. But I think we’re going to see a great thing around how do my physical products become digitalized to live both with me in my physical world and, and in my digital worlds and the role of NF t’s on packs or products? I think it’d be really exciting connected packages role in this kind of web three world web 3.0 world?

Tom White
Yeah. I mean, you’ve opened the hornet’s nest for me, right? Only because of NF T’s I think of NFT’s at the moment as really embryonic. You know, you’ve got basically kids flipping JPEGs at the moment, right? You’re making lots of money, and, but it’s like, where is this going to go? And I think, in a primary sense, you know, for 100 years, you were able to buy something and it wasn’t on the blockchain. Now it is. So everything that you buy everything that you access, and probably going to have a record of it on a digital ledger somewhere. What does this mean for connected packaging? You know, you scan something, do you get an NFT for that? Most NFT’s at the moment are a gateway into something else? Do you do get a ticket? Do you get entered into a drawer somewhere so forth? So that’s, that’s, for me is really interesting. I’d love to see the development. Yeah, one thing that I’m always keen on, and the things that we kind of always kind of come back to you on the podcast is privacy and security. So there’s a lot of data here, we’ve spoken about how you know that they’re using a Yo Valley yoghurt, but you don’t know which you’re gonna eventually you’re going to know which yoghurt they’re eating, and at what time and, you know, potentially where they are? How do we ensure that the data is being used in a meaningful and the right way? And is this a concern? Or is this something that you advise clients on as well?

Rob Hollands
Hugely, and I think it’s, it’s one of the outside of the wonderful, exciting things that will happen over the next 12 months, I think that’s one of the areas across everything within the IoT space. And you said it, right. It’s a vast amount of data. And it’s really personal data, you know, where and when I’m using my product, what products I’m buying across categories, as well. And it’s something we advise clients on, you know, from when we’re developing the first experience, any data that we’re capturing, we’re looking for a reason why a genuine reason why we’re capturing that data and potentially using it to do something usually optimised or enhanced experience for the customer.

Rob Hollands
So that’s one of the first things to do. But I think, as an industry, and it’s an area we’re looking into, there will need to be some work done to kind of self regulate all around transparency, and show, you know, if we’re, if we’re tracking your product interactions across all of these spaces, and your connections in the home, and your cars and all of these other areas, and how can we deliver all of that data to you and be really transparent about it? And I’ve not got the answer now. But it’s something we’re looking at solving, certainly on a kind of smaller level on the experiences we’re building. But I think it transcends that if you’re interacting in a retail space, if you’re then connecting with a product on the go. If you’re then back in your home with a smart device interacting with that product, that’s a lot of different ecosystems, touch points, data points, how can we put a layer in that takes all of that data and can show so you what’s being captured where and let you let you manage those settings. But that’s, that’s a problem problem to be solved.

Tom White
Yeah, yeah, I, you know, a big problem and important one. A lot of a lot of people talk about secure by design. So the original principles of it build outwards, which is interesting. The other element here as well, and I’m just kind of thinking out loud, this is sustainability piece. So funnily enough, actually, I’ve got a it’s January so I’m meal prepping. Right so I’m having my meals delivered to me and we start the new year fresh and I got a I got a box the other day and, and I was really surprised, because on the front, it said, free, easy steps to send this back to us. And I just thought well, I don’t see that that often. And it was a pretty good box. It was kind of sturdy as boxes go anyway. Right. And I think the combination of sustainability in packaging may be mixed with energy harvesting as well. So the fact that you know if we’re running circuit boards or something in there that they don’t need to be powered, or that well they don’t need to be replaceable power source, right? Yes. So that’s an interesting dynamic as well, in terms of the sustainability of this. And perhaps it’s something that you could offer or I just thinking out loud, you know, maybe to your brands and to your customers about getting some of this packaging back for reuse is, is this ever come up in conversations in the past?

Rob Hollands
It does. Yeah, we were doing a lot of work with Levi’s in this space, right? One of the observations there is, a lot of the time the reason that, you know, we’re all a bit lazy, to be honest. And we try and get it in the right recycle bin and, you know, do good things about products. If if we add an identity or digitalise that product, take a fashion garment, for example. And we say travel through the supply chain arrive in the consumers life, if that product exists somewhere on a blockchain, wherever it exists, and it’s digitalised. We we ascribe some form of ownership to it. And then when it comes to its end of life, and this is something we’re doing brilliantly with Levi’s, we’re, you know, we’re connecting their garments, we’re also allowing consumers to return them to Levi’s stores when they’ve reached the end of their life and via computer vision, kind of check them into a what we call a donation wall, and donate them back in return for loyalty points. And there’s definitely some things like your box for example. If you digitalise something, make it super easy. But some somehow, then we’ve got some ownership and proof of ownership, which then makes us behave good when it comes to that products end of life or the packaging is end of life, or whatever it is. So I think that’s a really important area. And yet another area where there’s definitely a growing kind of groundswell of briefs around how do we, how do we think through connected packaging through connected products? How can we drive more sustainable behaviours or be a more sustainable business? ,

Tom White
It’s fantastic. I never knew that story with Levi’s. I mean, that’s great, isn’t it, you know, that you can bring in some old jeans and you get loyalty points, it has to be worthwhile, doesn’t it? You know, otherwise, you’re not going to bother taking the trip to the store, given the fact that most purchases are done online, you have to have to go back to the store, you’re going to have to have something fairly worthwhile to be able to do that. But it’s really nice to see in the combat against fast fashion. Which is, which is a bit of an issue, right? In general. And so one big issue that we need to combat. Yeah, you know, it’s always staggering. So when we when we have people on and we and we talk about particular areas of in IoT, because it’s so expansive, you really just kind of uncover more and more things and more and more areas, and then connect the packaging in general, it’s huge. I mean, you really, you know, once you look into it, you can really see so many different possibilities, it’s absolutely great.

Rob Hollands
Most, most definitely. And once you connect to the packaging of the products, how it then lives within the connected home, you know, you can start to understand what products I got in my cupboard to deliver different experiences based on that could help you with your, your kind of meal planning that started each year and all that stuff. Yep. So great, great opportunities.

Tom White
Yeah. Fantastic. So So where are things going for sharp ends this year, obviously, you spoke about what we’ve spoken about a lot. So we’ve got data, privacy, different forms of connectivity, any major things on horizon you want to share today,

Rob Hollands
we were focusing on a lot of those areas that we’ve already talked about and scaling those things up. We’ve we’ve been a kind of very UK European centric business. We’ve seen a lot of growth outside of Europe over the last couple of years, and we’ll launch our kind of outpost him in the States this year, which will be super exciting. We’re doing a lot of work less a lot of companies to mention MAC Cosmetics out there, which is superb. We did during the lockdown, come up with a crazy initiative, which we call corner shop, which was to and we wanted to put some proof into kind of the connected retail space and showing how the product can live both in a store at home. In a connected environment.

Rob Hollands
We launched the first of those which is down in Shoreditch called corner shops. So it’s a fully connected retail space with all sorts of fantastic innovations in connected packaging sits at the core. And we’re just looking at how we can we can translate that into the US maybe it’s a mom and pop store. But we’re looking at that and that’s that’s a really exciting initiative, you know, doing something good for good for the industry as well to say you know, what’s, what’s the future of retail, and how can we demonstrate some of the fantastic things that are going to help retailers over the next few years?

Tom White
Fantastic. That’s great. Incorporating in Delaware in this in the states from the classic Delaware are fantastic. I mean, yeah, really, really interesting. Where can people find out more about the business, social media, etc. You want to share some links?

Rob Hollands
Definitely find me we’re on On LinkedIn connects with any of the team, their main source of everything, some great case study, as well as on our website, sharp and.com. So definitely, definitely have an end and give us a shout, particularly, you know, we’re keen to collaborate, we want to move the industry forward. So any partnerships in the space? And then definitely, and any clients that listened and need some help understanding how the IoT can support their brands, we’d love to chat.

Tom White
Excellent, fantastic, Rob. So come to the end of the show today, new feature on the podcast. Well, that’s a new feature, though, is it the third time I’ve said it, so I’m not sure if it’s new anymore, but I’ll say it again. So the new feature of the podcast, we’re asking our previous guests to think of a question for the upcoming guests. So our previous guests was Oliver Tucker, who’s the CEO of wireless logic. And he asked this question, and I’ll read it verbatim to the best of my ability will with the wider availability of high speed data networks and processing of data at the edge further opening up video image recognition applications? What innovative uses use cases for this? Are you seeing or predicting? So I think we touched on this a little bit, but it’d be useful to answer all of his question.

Rob Hollands
We’ve we’ve touched on this. And we have one of the things when we start to talk to brands about connected packaging, the big challenge always comes from it’s logistically there’s some supply chain considerations, how do I get codes on my pack? How do I incorporate and then encode NFC tags by building into my product? And a lot of clients or clients are very quick to arrive at though Wouldn’t it just be brilliant? If I could probably do it all without changing my packaging? That’s that’s been you know, the technology hasn’t been there, the licensee the challenges. And I think that’s, that’s one of the things that is coming now.

Rob Hollands
Still, with the barrier that we talked about, he might not know that individual product, but I think we’ll see we’ll see vast improvements there. And the work that we’re doing with Levi’s, I mean, it is a magical experience for the average consumer or for anyone that hasn’t kind of played with that technology, technology to be able to take your Levi’s into a store and a beautifully designed kind of visual wall and hold up a backpack or any product carrying one of the Levi’s back patches and it recognise that backpack and understand what products you’re holding. And then it deliver your reward and a wonderful experience based on that that type of stuff is fantastic for consumers. So I think we’ll see more more things like that. We’re obviously seeing we’re doing some work in our corner shop space as well kind of check out and go, you know, fully contactless checkout type of things. Using using really high tech computer vision to understand who’s picking and taking which item we’ll see progress there for for sure.

Tom White
Sorry, just quickly, Cornershop. Is that Is there a link to that off of the main website?

Rob Hollands
There is? Yeah, go check it out. And we we’ve we did a kind of two month pop up just before Christmas of opening the space. We’ve closed for a month now was we reset some of the tech and put some new innovations in and then kind of late February onwards, that space will be back open. Pretty much nine to five Monday to Friday for people to drop in and come and experience some of the things and all of your listeners and viewers be very welcome to pop down.

Tom White
Excellent. On that wonderful note. Rob, thank you so much being brilliant, insightful today. been great having you on the show.

Rob Hollands
Brilliant. Thanks something great. So great talk.

Tom White
And as always, guys, you can find more about the IoT podcast on LinkedIn and Twitter. And check out our website, the IoT podcast.com where you can watch all the previous episodes which are hosted on YouTube. It’d be great to know your thoughts on IoT and connected packaging, so please do get involved in the conversation. And until next time, cheers

The IoT Podcast Team

The IoT Podcast is powered by Paratus People, a leading organisation in IoT Talent Solutions.

Innovation is at the heart of IoT, it is our passion to explore and learn more about this fast paced and transforming sector.

Connect & Get Involved

Your subscription could not be saved. Please try again.
Your subscription has been successful.
Subscribe to our newsletter to be amongst the first to find out exclusive information about The IoT Podcast.

We use Sendinblue as our marketing platform. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their href="https://www.sendinblue.com/legal/termsofuse/">terms of use