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In episode 37, Jeremy Frank – CEO, KCF Technologies and manufacturing guru explores what Industry 4.0. means for everyday life🏭, why critical infrastructure matters⚙️ and whether technology really will take over humans jobs?! 🤖

We start the episode by exploring critical infrastructure in industry 4.0. and how ‘giving machines a voice’ is changing the ecosystem. We then begin to consider what IoT really means for the everyday person and how far people need to actually know about IoT for the industry to be able to grow. Ending the episode we discuss the future and whether technology will take over human jobs.

Sit back, relax, tune in and be the first to discover

🏭 Introduction to Jeremy’s IIoT background 00:20 – 01:50
⚙️ What is actually happening with the critical infrastructure we rely on as human beings in industry 4.0.? 01:50 – 05:40
🏭 What is Lean Manufacturing and its role in Industry 4.0.? 05:40 -07:40
⚙️ What does the term, ‘Giving machines a voice’ mean and how can this address the challenges in the industrial sector? 07:40 – 12:27
🏭 How can we take the IoT dream at an executive high-level view and bring it down to a realistic view to enrich peoples lives etc.? 12:27 -18:27
⚙️ How has IoT grown into the public and everyday life? 18:27 – 23:20
🏭 What are your judgements on the dystopian thought of technology taking over human jobs? Will this happen, especially within the industrial sectors? 23:20 – 29:29
⚙️What can we expect next from yourself and KCF? 29:29 – 32:46

Follow Jeremy

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeremy-frank

Find out more about KCF Technologies: https://kcftech.com/

ABOUT THE GUESTS

Jeremy Frank is President and CEO at KCF Technologies, a technology development company focused on the industrial sector and transforming the American industry by solving critical Industry 4.0 problems through the convergence of technology and people.

Episode Transcript

Tom White
Welcome to The IoT podcast Show. I’m your host, Tom white. Today I’m joined by Jeremy Frank. Jeremy is the CEO of KCF Technologies. KCF is a technology development company focused in the industrial sector, and transforming the American industry by solving critical industry 4.0 problems. Jeremy, it’s great to have you here. Thank you so much. And I’ve been looking forward to this. Could you tell me a little bit about yourself and a bit more about KCF?

Can you explain your background in IIoT and what KCF does? 

Jeremy Frank
Sure, I’d be happy to. And first of all, Tom, thanks for having me as a guest, I really appreciate it. Myself, I am, I’ve been in this world of technology development and using technology to solve problems for about 20 years, I did a PhD at Penn State University in Pennsylvania, and finished in the late 90s. So I was working on some of these underlying technologies that we are currently working on back then. And then started a company with the professor that I was working with out of, we have a speciality, deep area in vibration and machines at the centre called the Centre for acoustics and vibration. And our company was basically born out of that, and we’ve been at it for 20 years now. And I’ve been kind of started as one guy sitting in an office, and we’re now a pretty substantially sized and successful company in this space.

What is happening with the crucial infrastructure in Industry 4.0.? 

Tom White
Well, yeah, fantastic. It’s a great business. You know, I had to look into it a while ago. So we definitely are looking forward to getting you on here. Keen to kick off, Jeremy. I mean, what is actually happening with critical infrastructure at the moment? And why, you know, as human beings, we so dependent on this in industry 4.0, for our listeners out there?

Jeremy Frank
Yeah well, so I think I would, I would start, there’s a lot, there’s a lot there of like, what critical infrastructure is and what’s actually happening. I would start with the industry 4.0 part first, just because, you know, I know your focuses on IoT. Broadly, industry 4.0 isn’t necessarily a subset, but it’s one of these things transpiring simultaneously.

Jeremy Frank
Yeah, you know, I think I go back, you know, people might not remember what the other three industrial revolutions were. But the first one, just basically, machines using steam power instead of human power and animals to do work. And the second one is basically mass production and manufacturing, you know, so the Henry Ford assembly line being a classic example. And then the third industrial revolution in the 60s and 70s is just using computers and digital capabilities, like autonomous processes, control systems, robots, all that stuff.

Jeremy Frank
And so now, you know, we’re in this fourth industrial revolution, and  I hear a lot of people talk about industry 4.0, as though it’s just an abstraction or a buzzword. But there’s actually about 150 years of history, and we’re just in one wave of it, and none of those revolutions are completely done, you know, there’s still, there’s still a lot of things that are, that are being done the way they were 100 years ago, that I’m very exposed to. So anyway, the fourth industrial revolution is real, it’s happening from my point of view. And it’s all just about total awareness, you know, total awareness of all the necessary information in a manufacturing process or in a human life, that makes it possible to do everything that you want to do all the information in the right place at the right time.

Jeremy Frank
So, and there’s a lot happening there. The one thing I would say that I think is also relevant context for what is happening with critical infrastructure today is that there’s this whole other thing that isn’t always talked about when people talk about industry 4.0. And it’s the lean manufacturing revolution, you know, which really started and it really, you know, took major hold in the 80s. And the 90s. And Toyota is, you know, primarily represents that, and when it was shown to be as successful as it was, and it really does work. It had another major impact in the industrial world, which is my focus, you know, I’m really in the industrial Internet of Things. And I think it’s really important to kind of lay that out there because, you know, what lean and the Toyota way showed is that it’s not really just about the technology, it’s really about people and knowledge and you know, Kaizen, like learning and making good changes, continuous improvement.

Jeremy Frank
So now, what I see with critical infrastructure and industry 4.0 is we are at this major inflexion point, you know, it’s not that this is just a buzzword without meaning behind it. There’s a lot of change. There’s a lot of disruption and most of it is a good change and good disruption, but for a lot of it what I see is that the technologies that are being deployed do work, the promise is true, and it’s there. But most people have not yet figured out how to actually deploy it at scale and gain a real advantage from it.

What is Lean manufacturing and what role does it play within Industry 4.0.? 

Tom White
Yeah, yeah, absolutely. I think this is something I’ve really wanted to touch upon with you, Jeremy because you’re very well versed as an individual, but also KCF, within lean manufacturing. Could you just touch a little bit more on the balance of lean manufacturing and its interface within industry 4.0?

Jeremy Frank
Yeah sure, you know, I’ll say I’m not really a lean expert. But I’ve talked to a lot of lean experts, and we’re, we’re working, we’re serving some of just the absolute world-class, best developers and users of lean manufacturing. I think that just to keep it simple, I think what it really comes down to, and especially, it’s the Nexus with industry, 4.0, that I’m most focused on, you know, I’m not really a manufacturing expert, I’m a technology expert, being deployed into manufacturing. And the difference is, it’s all about the people, you know, lean is just rooted in the reality that, that people are central, and learning and knowledge are central and making incremental changes to make things better, are central. And I think that’s the really important thing.

Jeremy Frank
Because if you have a technology wave come along, and you forget about that, philosophically, you’ll end up with, you know, either disappointing or, in some cases, very bad outcomes. And, and I just think that you know there’s, I don’t know, if I can put a percentage on how many companies effectively employ lean manufacturing, philosophically and in practice, but there’s a lot to do, but there’s many more that don’t. And I think, you know, that just philosophical approach to focusing on the people focusing on continuous improvement if you do those things while embracing a technology wave, you’re going to have much better outcomes, then you’re going to have if you focus on the technology alone, and have a disregard for the people in the learning. And there’s a lot of stories like that out there. So that’s how I see it.

What processes are involved in delivering IIoT solutions and how can they address challenges faced in industry 4.0.? 

Tom White
Yeah, completely. And I think that’s a really valuable insight to see it from your point of view. And thank you for sharing that. Jeremy, you use the term giving machines of voice, and I know it’s come up several times, in articles, etc. Can you depict the processes involved in IIoT solutions? And how these address the challenges faced in the industrial environment?

Jeremy Frank 
Yeah, I’d love to. Yeah, that is a slogan we’ve been using for a while. And yeah, I’ll talk about that in the process, for how you deploy solutions. But maybe even before I do that, you know, why you need to give machines a voice is it’s just, it’s a mess out there. You know, there are, there are just these massive chronic issues that plague industry, again, within IoT, my space, my company is really focused within machines and critical, you know, we serve all the most critical largest manufacturers and industrial operators. And it’s a mess out there. There’s a there’s just blind spots, there are just chronic issues with inefficiency, waste, danger, you know, the majority of injuries that happen in the industrial workplace are because, you know, people are getting hurt when machines fail unexpectedly.

Jeremy Frank
And they’re either trying to fix them in a hurry or, or there’s actually some, you know, explosion or issue. Pumps are horribly inefficient, they fail prematurely fans are the same way. There’s just this total awareness is the ideal of industry 4.0. Unawareness is the chronic problem. And so what we did, we were doing, we were putting wireless sensors on machines in the early to mid-2000s. We were funded on some very forward-looking government programmes here in the United States, both in the Department of Defence and the Department of Energy, that was focused on, you know, the industrial sector. And we started putting sensors on machines and realise, you know, some of these blind spots and what’s actually happening out there where these problems come from. And it took us about five years before we realised this is around 2011 or 2012. That kind of just like I was saying, with lean some of the reasons that  I think that that’s so important is that we realised that the technology, having a sensor telling you that there was a problem wasn’t enough, you had to have a human being understand that. And we started calling that list, you know, listening to the health of the machine, giving machines a voice so that we can listen, and understand what’s happening to have awareness. And that’s what enables you to make a positive change and start to actually create better outcomes for things.

Jeremy Frank
It’s kind of interesting Tom because that slogan, you know, it’s actually something I see being replicated by others, you know, there are other companies that do what we do, that are using similar terminology these days. And the idea of, you know, condition-based maintenance, and, you know, root cause analysis, it’s not like, there’s something shockingly new about those. And those were talked about well before 2011.

Jeremy Frank
But what’s really new is actually deploying that taking advantage of, of those things that people sort of understood, and doing them at scale. So giving, if you own a factory that has 1000, critical machines, fans, pumps, compressors, all this stuff. Giving those machines the ability to communicate their health, to someone who can do something about it, that that’s what giving machines a voice means. And that’s why it’s creating these outcomes that are really positive and this whole movement.

How can bring IoT down to daily life, for the everyday person? 

Tom White
Yeah, I think it’s a really nice phrase, because, clearly, you know, from an early M2M perspective, having a machine to be able to communicate the talk and to be able to actually understand how that interaction is taking place, and the potential issues and the pros and cons of it is really, really important. And it links up really nicely to the next thing that I was going to ask you actually, Jeremy, because, you know, part of one of the reasons why we started this podcast is because IoT is kind of unheard of technology to most people still outside of the industry. And we really want to demystify it, so that people can understand how it really affects their lives. And I think it’s a lot closer to people’s everyday lives than then they perhaps think, right?

Tom White
I know, when I go into a coffee shop, then I go on to the Wi-Fi network, there’s always an IoT server in there somewhere, right, and it’s even got it. And I wonder just how many people think, what is this? And what is this? You know, what is this Wi-Fi network? And how can it affect me? How can we take this whole IoT dream at a sort of the executive high-level point of view and really take it back down to the grassroots to enrich people’s lives In your view? What are the types of things that we could look to do to make that transition?

Jeremy Frank 
Well you know it’s interesting, Tom, so I’m a technologist, sort of, you know, engineer PhD, but, you know, I’m not really a deep technologist the way some people are, I think, you know, what your question makes me kind of think that, you know, most people don’t really need to know how the sausage gets made, you know, how this all works? Like, I don’t have a clue how my cell phone works. What matters is that anything, you know, my mother, she’ll, she’ll never need to know what IoT is, or what it does, even if it affects her life. And it probably will.

Jeremy Frank
And, you know, I think it’s, um, it’s about the use cases. People don’t really need to know about the technology, you can go into a coffee shop, and you know, the machines and the coffee brewing process can be having all the smart data flowing. All you want is the best tasting cup of coffee that you want. I think it’s the same thing in the industrial world is that it’s really, from my point of view, what matters is the users. If IoT is enabling users to actually do something better than they otherwise would have, that’s what matters.

Jeremy Frank
And you know, there are a small number of us that are kind of in the nitty-gritty and developing the tools, and deploying the tools that make that possible. But it’s really not the executives, I think, you know, myself being an executive, so I’ll just sort of put myself in that camp. Executives can’t really do the things that need to be done. What you need is for someone who can actually go out and change something and fix a problem. You need those people, to do something different. I think what executives can do is really just notice what’s happening, where things are working and invest appropriately, you know, notice those patterns and replicate them, scale them.

Jeremy Frank 
It really all comes down to -and again, it’s very rooted in the lean Toyota philosophy. It’s just all about doing things at the gamba at the plant level and making good choices to facilitate it. And I can actually, I can give you an example if it’s helpful because it’s not like we had a big brain flash and thought of all of this, you know, 510 years ago, we figured it out. We actually had a lot of work in a very challenging industrial application. We do the most critical applications in oil and gas, automotive manufacturing, forest products, pharmaceuticals, power plants, nuclear plants.

Jeremy Frank
But in oil and gas, the most challenging applications are, from my point of view or within upstream and specifically, right in hydraulic fracturing. I know there’s a lot more of that in North America than there is where you are. But it’s a big deal here. And it’s really had a major impact on our whole economy in the world’s economy. Well, at the very nitty-gritty of oil and gas, hydraulic fracturing, there are pumps, you know, on a given site, there’s about 15, to 20, huge pumps, 2500 horsepower pumps, that are the critical engine that what actually accomplishes hydraulic fracturing, which is generating pressure and moving it down the hole pumping sand.

Jeremy Frank
And five years ago, when we encountered that application and started giving machines a voice, the people running those pumps were just totally unaware, completely blind to what was happening with the health of the pumps, even though they knew the pressure that was they knew about the hydraulic fracturing process, and they knew a lot about the geology, they knew almost nothing about what was happening with these critical pumps that they depend on. And because of that, there was a lot of big, big problems, you know, that these pumps would only last like, three months and they’re just like a $70,000 piece of equipment. And people would get injured, I mean, there are stories that I’ve heard of fatalities, you know, when these pumps, you’re talking about 10, to 15,000 pounds of pressure, psi, when they fail, it’s, it’s really can be quite catastrophic. And there are fatalities, I’ve heard, you know, detailed stories.

Jeremy Frank
Anyway, you give machines a voice, you deploy the technology, it doesn’t really matter if the guy working on that site, understands what IoT is, what matters is you start to have that data come out of the red zone, and get on a data screen that he can look at in a safe place. And that was five years ago, today, he or she can be in a command centre, back at headquarters, looking at the data of that pump in real-time, and make better decisions about what’s going to affect the health of it, and I mean, it’s unbelievable the outcomes.

Jeremy Frank
We’ve had applications, one company in particular FTS International, as has talked about this openly, they’ve quadrupled the life of their pumps, you know, instead of lasting three months, they last a full year. They’ve eliminated like, two thirds, three-quarters of the downtime, almost all of the safety incidents eliminated. And that’s where I say the executives in that example in general they don’t need – It’s okay if it’s unheard of, you know, IoT, it’s okay, if they don’t know how it works. They just have to know that they have to care that keeping their people healthy and keeping their sites productive and efficient, is a priority, which most do. All they have to do is notice that this new way of doing things works, and then embrace it, and then invest in it. And we see this happen. So it’s really a good story it’s a positive story.

Tom White
Yeah, I think so, thank you for sharing that. That’s a really nice example. Because it’s it’s a real-world event that has been changed for the better by an IoT deployment. And I think going back to my original question, I think this is how we can get it out there to the wider world, that the problem and the solution can be enabled by sensors, by, you know, a variety of different methods related to IoT. We’ve had people on the podcast who have constructed solutions to improve the amount of information that gets to hospitals when people are in ambulances. And people who are creating sensors for freight shipping. So, when you’re transporting, you know, fruit and vegetables right across the world. And it’s, you know, it’s perishing, it’s going off, you need to reroute that somewhere.

Tom White
So you’re looking at temperature, you’re looking at moisture, you’re looking at other bits and pieces. And I think when people actually understand the benefit of that, that’s when it starts to get into the public psyche. And I think that’s when people can actually start saying, Hey, this is actually quite interesting. So what is this? And that’s, that’s, that’s the hope we’re doing things like this, and this is why we’re so pleased that you’re on the show, and I know you have your own podcast, right, you know, and getting it out there so that people can actually start Googling this and actually start seeing, okay, so there are other use cases, there are other applications. So I’m 100% with you on that, that I think it’s a real-world application, isn’t it that needs to happen in order for, for this adoption and general understanding to take part in the rest of culture really.

Jeremy Frank 
I agree, I love those examples, because it is, it’s the same thing that we see in our space in the industrial kind of critical infrastructure space, you don’t really need to know how the tags on the shipping crate, shipping containers or, or sending the data, you just want fresh vegetables, you know, you care about the application and the use case, if you’re in the ambulance, you don’t really care what they’re measuring, or how it’s, while maybe some people might care what’s being measured, but generally speaking, you just want to show up at the hospital with and have them have the right tools and the right medicine that’s going to make you healthy. And so totally, I’m so glad that you’re helping to get the word out about these things. Because it is it’s all about the use cases. And it really does work.

Jeremy Frank 
You know, we are deep in this industrial space. But the broad story of IoT, I just think it’s the same thing across the board. There are just these powerful use cases everywhere. There’s one interesting thing that I think is different, you know, about like, the Internet of Things in compared to just like the internet or even smartphones, I think it’s just kind of the next revolution, right. But you know, the Internet, and smartphones are really tools used by human beings in our personal lives. And so, the use cases are sort of more natural, you know, you get GPS on your phone, you get email on your phone. And so the applications were relatively straightforward. I think IoT is different because all these things aren’t human. And so they are complex, and there are only certain experts that really understand what’s going on. And so it’s just a little more, it’s slower, and it’s more complex, and but it’s also bigger in total from all the applications and use cases. That’s what I think is so fascinating about this Internet of Things, evolution, and why I’m so glad that you’re helping to get the word out.

Tom White
Thank you. No, I really appreciate that. I mean, again, just to touch on that. So I’ve, I’ve come from a background and working very closely in pay-TV, right. And you end up going down this rabbit hole of deep tech within what was one set-top box (STB) to now over the top video (OTT), and you’ve got the likes of Netflix and Amazon Prime and, you know, various other providers, and something that really kind of doesn’t state to adrift from my mind is that ultimately, it’s just TV, right?

Tom White
So no, no matter what you kind of think about or no matter what you kind of look into it, it’s just TV, it’s just another film. Yes, the content could be great. But it’s never going to have that impact that there’s something in it could with the examples that you’ve mentioned, the examples I’ve talked about today. And I think I think that’s a really good thing. And that’s why I’m quite passionate about being able to talk about these things.

Will technology and IoT take away peoples jobs? 

Tom White
Jeremy, I wanted to move on and understand your thoughts here on quite a poignant question. And something which probably is in the culture of the general public a lot more than perhaps ourselves in the technology industry. Is this view of technology taking over human jobs? So AI, automation, robotics, I mean, it’s widely spoken about the, you know, certainly from an industrial point of view, warehouses, etc. Now being kind of, you know, unmanned to a large degree will it happen100% in the industrial sector, what’s your thoughts on that?

Jeremy Frank
That is such an interesting question. I know we have a limited amount of time, so I’ll keep it focused, but I could talk about that particular is because I think it’s fascinating. You know, I just the one contextual thing is the writings of Noah Yuval Harare. He’s an Israeli historian. The books are Sapiens and homo Deus and 21 lessons for the 21st century. He talks in just amazing depth of detail about this kind of topic, you know, dystopian future where humans essentially become irrelevant. And I mean, I think there are real issues there in general. I won’t go down that philosophical rabbit hole, but he has, it’s really masterful. It’s really amazing stuff to read if you haven’t read it.

Jeremy Frank 
But I do think that there are real things I don’t even think it’s the future. You know, I have a couple of teenage kids. And it’s just like you see, the impact smartphones are already having on our engagement and our ability to be present. And I like to think that my kids are about as engaged as they can be. But we’re already dealing with these challenges of human beings almost becoming overtaken by technology. Having said that, in the industrial world, in the critical infrastructure and manufacturing that we serve from my point of view, it’s the total opposite. And it’s a really, really positive story. And the reason I say that is, you know, the idea of, I mean, in the United States, it’s already happening, the number of jobs in manufacturing has already dropped over the last couple decades from like, 20 million to 12 million or 11, or something like that.

Jeremy Frank 
And you could look at that as a bad thing, you know, we have these work, my grandfather was a union worker in a Westinghouse appliance manufacturing plant. And you could look at that as a bad thing. But the way I look at it is there’s, it’s not good for human beings to be doing repetitive, dangerous. difficult work and that’s what a lot of what’s being replaced is like, for example, there’s one that I think if you’ve ever seen the movie, Eight Mile, you know, the musician, kind of biography, his life in Detroit, there’s part of the movie where he’s working in an auto stamping plant. And his job is to pick up a big piece of sheet metal, put it on the thing, push the buttons, and presses the hood, or the whatever, and he moves it over there. And that’s his job all day, he’s just doing that. It is difficult to reconcile the reality that the person that does that job, if they have to do something different, or if they lose their job that’s painful and difficult, and it’s scary. And that’s where the dystopian thoughts come.

However, I think when I mean, I actually worked with my father in the 80s and 90s, he had an engineering, forensic business, basically investigating industrial accidents. There was one I remember distinctly where someone using a press just like that, someone had disengaged the safety guards, which, which prevent you from having the press activate without pushing both buttons simultaneously. Somehow, he was either in a hurry or wanted to increase production, someone just disengaged the safety guards, he pushed the press while his hand was still in there smashed his hand cut off his fingers is that kind of thing happens all the time. Getting people out of that kind of work is actually a really good thing for society. What I think people don’t realise that I’m immersed in all the time, is it just creates this, there’s no job loss, it actually is the opposite. It creates an opportunity for people to elevate their skillset, and do more interesting, more problem solving more elevated work overtime.

Jeremy Frank 
And the difficult thing I think what so many people struggle with. And believe me, I’ve been in rooms where I’ve been yelled at by UAW auto workers who are very focused on this topic. But the cool thing is, when people realise what’s actually happening, you know, even that we’re developing really good relationships with those same kinds of people because you realise that doing a difficult, boring, dirty job is actually not a good job. Doing an elevated knowledge-based learning job, which is where those jobs are all going, especially in manufacturing, that’s a good job. And it’s, it’s something that I think the next generation is really going to be embodying. And there’s a tremendous opportunity. I mean, there is a massive shortage already and getting worse and having enough people who understand how machines work, who understand how to work with robots, who understand how to build an automated manufacturing process, how to use industrial IoT technology. So I personally think it’s actually a really good story. Yet, I also understand that it’s scary because people don’t like change.

What can we expect from KCF Technologies in the future? 

Tom White
Yeah. It’s a great answer. And it’s a great view to share. And I echo that I think, I think we’re not taking over people’s jobs. I think we’re changing people’s jobs. And some could say for the better, you know, we’re intelligent, you know, bright, articulate – well, most of us in the world, I suppose- beings, should we really be doing manual labour jobs? That’s why we create machines. That’s why we have automation to do this. So could we be doing better things? And it’s a great view. And I completely agree with you. Right? And, yeah, let’s see what happens in the future. Jeremy, I know, we’re kind of running out of time, a little bit on this slot. But what can we expect next from yourself and KCF?

Jeremy Frank 
Well, I mean, we’re just we’re fueling a revolution. And you know, I would it’s not the future if this is the present. I mean, this is happening, what what’s really happening again, back to your very first question about, you know, what’s really going on, companies are going to be living and dying and surviving, or not surviving based on how well they deal with this change. And the workers are just going to have this challenge and it’s, it’s just the reality, people have to have to learn and adapt and it’s going to be a lot of change. It’s ultimately a good change, but it’s a painful change. That’s all happening in the present.

Jeremy Frank 
And it’s funny because a lot of the big companies that I think when you’re talking about the TV example, something else that’s in, in our space in the industrial space is there’s a lot of big companies that, that provide and own a lot of that machinery and software and equipment. Those aren’t the kind of companies that can really figure out the use cases. It’s a bunch of, you know, focused players, some niche companies, companies like mine, and many other like them. There’s this whole revolution going on of companies figuring out the use cases. And in transforming industry, you know, our whole focus is to transform the industry from unaware, wasteful, inefficient, dangerous to a future state where it’s safer, no waste, no downtime. And that’s what’s happening. We’re just feeling that revolution. And I’m just thrilled to be doing it. So I appreciate you having me on the show and having a chance to help get the word out.

Tom White
You’re very welcome. Yeah, it’s fantastic. Some of the work that you’re doing. And, you know, you guys really are setting the pace for this revolution, right, for this fourth revolution, of course. So, you know, good on you. And good to hear everything that you’re doing. Jeremy, where can everyone find you online? Are you on socials, I assume Twitter on various bits and pieces?

Jeremy Frank 
All the usual things, you know, our company’s website is KCFTech.com. And as you mentioned, I do have a podcast of my own. It’s called the industrial transformation podcast. And, I’d say those are the two best places to find us. And it’s interesting again, I’m just so appreciative of what you’re doing with this IoT podcast. My real focus is just getting some of these specific stories out, you know, the use cases in industry and helping to shine a light on what’s happening. So those two, KCFTech.com, you can find out what our company does and just the stories we’re trying to capture and document those on the Industrial Transformation Podcast.

Tom White
Okay, perfect. Jeremy, thank you so much. It’s, been great to have you on today. Really appreciate it. And you can find out more about the IoT podcast show by following us on Twitter and LinkedIn. Come and join the conversation and tell us what your thoughts are on Industry. 4.0 is progression and what changes you have seen to subscribe to our newsletter, please hit the link in the comments below.

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